BEST SCENE EVER # 51

SNATCH (Desert Eagle Scene)

directed by Guy Ritchie starring Brad Pitt

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Genre: Thriller-Comedy

Guy Ritchie’s sophomore follow-up to his 1998 sleeper hit Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels, Snatch revisits the previous film’s territory of London’s crime-ridden underbelly, and does so with the same brand of humor and stylish direction that made Ritchie’s first effort a surprise success. With a labyrinthine plot that is ostensibly oriented around a missing diamond, Snatch introduces viewers to three groups of characters intent on retrieving the elusive stone, which has been stolen from an Antwerp jeweler.

In the first group are friends and business partners Turkish (Jason Statham, who also supplies the film’s voice-over narration) and Tommy (Stephen Graham), who join up with Mickey (Brad Pitt), an Irish gypsy and boxer. Turkish and Tommy make arrangements with Mickey to take a fall in a match engineered by lunatic gang leader Brick Top (Alan Ford). In another corner resides equally loony Russian gangster Boris the Blade (Rade Sherbedgia), who has asked Jewish gangster Franky Four Fingers (Benicio Del Toro) to place a bet on the match for him.

Rating: 8.5/10

EXTRA: Video Making-Off with Guy Ritchie

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BEST SCENE EVER # 44

BARRY LYNDON directed by Stanley Kubrick

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Genre : Drama

Stanley Kubrick’s “Barry Lyndon,” received indifferently in 1975, has grown in stature in the years since and is now widely regarded as one of the master’s best. It is certainly in every frame a Kubrick film: technically awesome, emotionally distant, remorseless in its doubt of human goodness. Based on a novel published in 1844, it takes a form common in the 19th century novel, following the life of the hero from birth to death. The novel by Thackeray, called the first novel without a hero, observes a man without moral, character or judgment, unrepentant, unredeemed. Born in Ireland in modest circumstances, he rises through two armies and the British aristocracy with cold calculation.

Rating : 8.75/10

The soundtrack is amazing, even better than the movie itself :

– Memorable song : « Sarabande » by Haendel

Please find the full Barry Lyndon’s soundtrack below :
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072684/soundtrack

BEST SCENE EVER # 43

– “TRAINING DAY” directed by Antoine Fuqua

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Genre:  Thriller – Crime – Drama

“Training Day” is a 2001 American crime drama film directed by “Antoine Fuqua”, starring “Denzel Washington & Ethan Hawke”. The story follows two LAPD narcotics detectives over a 24-hour period in the gang neighborhoods of North West and South Central Los Angeles.

The film was a box office success and earned mostly positive critical appraisal. Washington’s performance, a departure from his usual roles, was particularly praised and earned him an Academy Award for Best Actor at the 74th Academy Awards. His co-star Ethan Hawke was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance as a rookie cop.

Rating: 8/10

BEST SCENE EVER # 42

“8th and final rule: if this is you first night at fight club, you have to fight!”

– FIGHT CLUB directed by David Fincher

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Genre : Thriller- Crime- Drama

Fight Club is a David Fincher’s movie released in 1999 based on the novel of the same name written by Chuck Palahniuk. Norton plays the unnamed protagonist, an « everyman » who is discontented with his white-collar job. He forms a “fight club” with soap maker Tyler Durden, played by Pitt, and they are joined by men who also want to fight recreationally. The film’s narrator attends support groups of all kinds as a way to “experience” something within his unfeeling, commercial existence.

Fincher intended Fight Club’s violence to serve as a metaphor for the conflict between a generation of young people and the value system of advertising.

Rating : 9/10

BEST SCENE EVER # 34

Pay it Forward directed by Richard LaGravenese starring Kevin Spacey

“How about possible?”

Enjoy a slice of optimism, so sweet… an excellent movie.

BEST SCENE EVER # 31

– HEAT directed by Brian de Palma